Dillon 10 yo – Duncan Taylor

dillonThe Rum : Dillon single cask 10 yo
Origin: Martinique
Distilled: 03-2002 in column stills
Bottled: 11-2012 by Duncan Taylor
Abv: 54.5 %
Single (bourbon) cask number 4 – 240 bottles

The Dillon distillery in Martinique was an agricole producing distillery situated on a sugar estate dating back to 1690. First rhum production took place in the 19th century.

In the first years of the 21st century (2005 to be precise) production (distillation) was moved to the Depaz Distillery in the north of Martinique, but ageing and bottling still takes place at the Dillon estate.

A few years ago independent whisky bottler Duncan Taylor started to bottle a series of single cask rums. Some rather good, some very poor. So buying a bottle of this series is always a bit of a gamble.

The Nose: Forget the official tasting notes on the backlabel of the bottle. I’m not sure what they were drinking at Duncan Taylor, but definitely NOT what’s in the bottle. Tropical fruits? Lime? Banana?? Most definitely not. Vegetal and sweet-grassy with a slight acidic touch and firm wood. Hints of toasted bread but also a bit of a metallic aroma. Lacks depth and complexity. After a good  30 minutes more dusty notes. Adding water makes the aroma more pleasant, with some fruitiness (apricots) coming through.

Taste: firm alcohol and bitter woody taste. Definitely a rhum that stayed a couple years too long in the cask! Rather mineral with an unpleasant kind of sweetness on the background. Again lacking depth and complexity. Adding water softens the alcohol but does nothing more than that.

Finish: Medium long with – again – way too much wood. The metallic aroma is now more present in the aftertaste.

Score : **  Not really bad, but definitely nothing special. It would be OK if this was a 30 euro bottle,  but with a price more than double (almost tripple)  : no thank you! I’m afraid another ‘hit and miss’ by Duncan Taylor

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Posted on 27 April 2017, in Rum and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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